Do Your Due Diligence Before Accepting That Next Order–No Matter How Good It Looks

Earlier today I had an email exchange with an alleged scammer (“Matt”) who wanted to buy 7,500 flash drives and various other electronic products. He had no idea that PPAI doesn’t make or sell promotional products. He said he got my name from “a promotional list.’ Having heard of a few recent scams, I decided to play along.

PPB -- May Issue, pp. 21-24

PPB — May Issue, pp. 21-24

During my exchange, I did a little research and found the business to be non-existent, the shipping address to be an abandoned house in another city (thank you Google Maps) and no chance of verifying a credit card prior to accepting the order. Needless to say, when the interrogation continued, Matt quietly backed out of the deal.

Let this be a reminder that in business (as in life) there are people who will prey on those less informed (or maybe a bit too motivated to close a deal). With more and more business being conducted online, it is increasingly important that you pay attention and do whatever due diligence is necessary to make sure the people you are doing business with are who they say they are.

I have attached a link to a recent column in PPB that talks about this type of scam and others, and how you can better protect yourself from becoming the next victim.

PPB Column: “Are You The Next Victim?

Be careful out there.

Paul

One response to “Do Your Due Diligence Before Accepting That Next Order–No Matter How Good It Looks

  1. I agree and enjoyed the article. They are getting more and more sophisticated. We had dealt with one recently that had created a website to look even more legitimate and used an address that had a wonderful looking complex on Google maps. I am sure that at some point in the order process the ship to address would have changed but all looked legitimate but something did not smell right. Upon researching the web address on whois.com, the web url was purchased just days before we received the order and there was no such company at the complex. Remember the good old days when blank goods was a sign of fraudulent orders?

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