Tag Archives: market research

Promotional Products Targeted By Proposed Oklahoma Tax Plan

Take Action To Protect The
Promotional Products Industry

OklahomaPromotional products are under fire in Oklahoma. To solve a budget crisis, a group of Oklahoma state representatives are proposing a host of spending cuts and unfortunately spending on promotional products is a target.

Make no mistake, the Promotional Products Association International (PPAI) is in favor of balanced budgets and the responsible use of tax payer dollars, but it would be a shame for Oklahoma to pass a bill that would eliminate any opportunity for the state to use promotional products in a powerful and effective manner.

Promotional products educate, recruit, highlight safety awareness, urge organ donations and encourage healthy living and lifestyle choices. Promotional products recognize and reward employee achievements and inspire action. Promotional products are used to celebrate milestones, sign legislation and reinforce critical messages.

Promotional products are the most cost-effective method to communicate critical messages. On an annual basis, promotional products contribute more than $175 million to the Oklahoma economy, with 416 companies and providing more than 2500 jobs.

Promotional products provide tangible value for their cost and an efficient means of conveying a message and producing desired behavior than traditional advertising methods.

Please reach out to your state representative and tell them that you support responsible spending and the effective use of promotional products to promote essential government programs and urge them to do the same.

Below you will find the letter sent to Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin, the Oklahoma state legislators and the media by PPAI on behalf of the promotional products industry.

Dear Governor Fallin:

The Promotional Products Association International (PPAI) is in favor of balanced budgets and the responsible use of tax payer dollars, however, despite budget constraints, the Oklahoma legislature and its agencies must still inform and educate the public by marketing its vital services and programs. We maintain that when an organization needs to cut marketing dollars, the decision should be based on the effectiveness of the marketing media in consideration.

The proposed moratorium on promotional products advertising will diminish the ability of the state and its agencies to effectively and efficiently communicate and deliver essential programs and services like education, employment, health care, disaster relief, social services and fire and police protection to the citizens of Oklahoma by eliminating the most useful and tangible form of communication—promotional products.

In short, promotional products advertising is preferred by consumers while other forms of media are avoided or blocked. In fact, promotional products are kept in places and spaces no other advertising medium can touch and provide greater recall, referral and response rates than other forms of advertising.

For government agencies to be effective, they must first keep the lines of communications open by staying in touch with the citizens they serve. One of the most important things to remember in the success of any government service program is what the benefits are and how to gain access them. Promotional products are an integral part of this process and ensure the state of Oklahoma is in touch with its citizens and that essential information is always close at hand.

Promotional products are proven to be one of the most effective media available to advertisers. Because promotional products are tangible, useful and highly targeted to the audience they reach, 79 percent of consumers retain them for one to more than four years, and 87 percent recall the advertiser/message, delivering the highest rate of reach, recall and return on investment in the advertising industry.

Promotional products educate, recruit, highlight safety awareness, urge organ donations and encourage healthy living and lifestyle choices. Promotional products recognize and reward employee achievements and inspire action. Promotional products are used to celebrate milestones, sign legislation and reinforce life-saving messages.

Promotional products are the most cost-effective method to communicate important messages to Oklahomans. On an annual basis, promotional products contribute more than $175 million to the Oklahoma economy, with 416 companies and providing more than 2500 jobs.

Sincerely,
Paul Bellantone, CAE
President and CEO
Promotional Products Association International

Take action today to support the promotional products industry in the great state of Oklahoma.

Paul

 

Paper Calendars Endure Despite the Digital Age | Guest Post by NYT Reporter, Christopher Mele

Today I am pleased to share with you this feature on printed calendars published by The New York Times. I would like to express my gratitude to the reporter Christopher Mele and to PPAI members Jerome Hoxton, president of Tru Art Advertising Calendars, and Melissa Ralston, marketing director for BIC Graphic, for their contributions.

Paul

~~~~~~~~~~

By Christopher Mele, Reporter, The New York Times

Digitally published in The New York Times on December 29, 2016 and in print on December 30, 2016, on Page B2 of the New York edition.

With the year’s end comes the ritual of many households and offices: getting new appointment books, planners or calendars to hang on walls or put on desks.

In an age of smartphones and the internet, you might think the days of paper calendars are numbered, but data suggest otherwise. Not only have they survived the digital revolution, but sales of some kinds of print calendars have increased.

The sales of appointment books and planners grew 10 percent from 2014-15 to 2015-16 to $342.7 million, and decorative and other calendars increased by 8 percent to $65 million in that time, according to figures from the NPD Group, a consumer research firm.

Personalization has helped make planners and appointment books popular, Leen Nsouli, an analyst of the office supplies industry at NPD, said in an email.

“The consumer can customize a planner to fit his or her style with accessories, colors and even color code events and activities,” she wrote. “That’s not something you can do on the standard phone calendar.”

ta-medforce-calendar

Promotional calendars are a way for businesses to advertise and to connect with customers. | Credit: MedForce

Jerome Hoxton, president of Tru Art Advertising Calendars in Iowa City, Iowa, said traditional calendars remain popular because they combine aesthetics with utility. Paper and digital calendars can readily coexist.

“What we found is it’s a question of and,” he said. “It’s not a question of or.”

Bertel King Jr., in a blog post last year for Make Use Of, a technology and productivity site, made the case for paper calendars, noting that he was “inundated with notifications, beeps, alerts and messages.”

“Having to open another tab, fire up another piece of software, or launch another app to access my calendar amounts to one more onscreen thing vying for my attention,” he wrote. “Suddenly a paper planner starts to make sense.”

It may seem counterintuitive that a print product can thrive in the digital age. But the continued success of some paper calendars mirrors that of printed books, an industry that several years ago was confronting what seemed like the very real possibility that e-books would outsell the printed variety. Instead, a Pew survey this fall found that most readers still preferred their reading material printed on paper.

Still, the popularity of some calendars — desk pads and the ones that hang on your wall — has waned.

The average number of printed calendars in households was 3.12 in 2011 compared with 3.98 in 1981, according to the most recent study sponsored by the Promotional Products Association International and the Calendar Advertising Council. The kitchen remained the prime display location, with 75 percent of respondents saying they had a calendar there. The average number of printed calendars per business was 2.10, down from 2.56 in 1981, according to the study.

A 2008 paper from Virginia Tech, called “An Exploratory Study of Personal Calendar Use,” predicted the march of electronic calendars would be swift and inevitable. “With the increased use of mobile devices, more and more calendaring tasks are performed off the desktop computer,” it said.

A bright spot in the industry remains promotional calendars, like those distributed by real estate agents, medical professionals, car repair shops and other businesses. As a percentage of sales of promotional products, those calendars have held steady or increased slightly from 2012 to 2015, according to industry figures.

chalkboard-calendar-bic-graphic

Paper calendars are an effective advertising vehicle with a mass market appeal. | Credit: Wright County Parks & Recreation

Melissa Ralston, marketing director for BIC Graphic, said in an email that companies have found paper calendars to be an effective advertising vehicle with a mass market appeal.

She said studies have found that 82 percent of recipients enjoy getting a calendar as a complimentary gift and 70 percent plan to do business with the company that provided the calendar.

As for Ms. Ralston, she practices what she preaches. She said she has three calendars: a planner, a wall calendar and one on her refrigerator.

U.S. Marshals Service’s Use of Appropriated Funds to Purchase Promotional Items

Recently several national media outlets reported on the U.S. Marshals Service’s Use of Appropriated Funds to Purchase Promotional Items.

Below, in a letter to the media, we present the facts.

With regard to POLITICO’s news story published on November 5, 2013, about the U.S. Marshals Service’s Use of Appropriated Funds to Purchase Promotional Items, please allow me to present a different view on the efficacy of promotional products.

The promotional items deemed “not necessary,” according to the article, are anything but. In fact, points raised in the article are exactly why promotional products are one of the most effective, cost-efficient and longest-lasting media used by advertisers, marketers and the U.S. Marshals Service. Compared to other media, promotional products are the sixth fastest-growing advertising medium, ranking eighth among traditional and digital media in annual expenditures at $18.5 billion. The government report actually acknowledges this in its findings.

Anyone, including the U.S. government that has used promotional products knows why they will use them again. Promotional products are the only tangible advertising medium with the ability to deliver a sensory-level brand engagement experience as well as an 88-percent brand name recall and retention of one and up to four years among consumers.

Promotional products generate interest, action and loyalty—in short results. These results distinguish them as one of the most effective, longest-lasting and best-loved advertising media in the world. For more information: www.ppai.org/research.

I am happy to talk with you about the effectiveness of promotional products and the vibrant business community I represent. I can be reached at 972-258-3050 or by e-mail at PaulB@ppai.org.

Sincerely,

Paul Bellantone, CAE

CALL TO ACTION

Once again, I must ask you to be ever watchful and vigilant in protecting the interests of the promotional products industry. Included below are steps you can take now and in the future when these types of reports occur:

  1. Immediately share the news with PPAI by emailing stories/reports to PR@ppai.org
  2. Keep an eye out for rumors and threats to the industry’s credibility–if you hear of something, let us know.
  3. Advocate! Stand up for the industry that has been so good to you and to all of us—defend its good name.
  4. And finally, know the facts. They are strongly in our favor. For more information visit, http://www.ppai.org/inside-ppai/research/